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Winter, 2005 Issue

The North Forty, More Than Just Land
alpacaWhat is an alpaca and how did they end up in Osborne? Alpacas, as defined by Webster's Dictionary, are South American llamas. Its orgins can be traced back to the Inca Empire in South America. Throughout history, alpaca fleece was a means of measuring one's wealth. They finaly found their way to the United States in 1983. However, when in Kansas, people tend to think of cows and plows not alpacas. That may be the case in most instances, but for Mitch and Vickie Vandament alpacas fit right in.

Beeees by the Buzzillion!
When asked how many bees he has, Jerry Brown’s standard answer is a “buzz-illion.” Seems fitting given that Brown’s Honey Farm, located at Haddam, is the state’s largest bee operation. The farm, which has 4,200 beehives, got its start in the 1920s when Jerry’s grandfather, Vernon Adee, began keeping bees.“In the early 1900s it was common for families to have a few beehives just as it was common for families to have a few cows, some chickens or a goat,” Jerry says. “The honey was then used as a sweetener instead of sugar.”

Making Tracks of Memories
Preserving history keeps traditions alive; educating younger generations about their roots is the life blood of a community's past and future. Although history may exist largely in our minds, real, tangible artifacts still tell thousands of stories. When one of these artifacts is lost, we lose far more than a physical object. We lose our past, we lose who we are.

Traveling the Hills Home
My brother’s red Monte Carlo coupe glides west on Highway I-70 towards Wichita. He has picked me up in Manhattan, where I attend K-State, on his way from Lawrence, where he attends KU. It's Saturday and we’re both going home for the weekend.

Kansas in Snow
Snowfall in Mitchell county...
buffalo

 

 

 

 

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Last Updated June 22, 2007
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