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Summer 2008 Issue

Cloud County

Marsha Doyenne
Marsha Doyenne (Photos by Tom Parker)

No Place Like Home

A common perception is that when young people graduate they leave town and never look back, swapping parochial backwaters for the glitz and glamor of big cities. They disappear Out There, by which rural folk mean the greater world, a distant city or a megalopolis stitched to a coastline. East or West, they’re one and the same. A smaller number, a fraction really, head Over There, which once meant Great Britain and Europe and countries with strange names and languages nobody at home could speak; and an even smaller number slip off Down Under, which is about as far as one can go from Kansas and still remain on the planet.

Riley County

Memoirs of John W Bartleson: Chapter Two: Part Three, Freedom and Home!

We arrived at Savannah in due time. The night we boarded the trains at Andersonville, we drew a small ration. Among other things, each drew a piece of bacon. Each piece a little longer than your finger, and usually the inside each out by skippers, only the rind and a piece of razor back being le[KU9] ft. Partner and I ate one piece in the dark, placing the other piece in a tin cup for our morning breakfast. The next morning the piece of meat was moving around in the tin cup. I began to rake off the skippers when one of my comrades asked me what I was going to do with them. I answered, “Throw them away.” He said, “Give them to me.” He ate them. I told him they did not hurt the meat, but I had never eaten maggots when I was home and was not going to begin.

Kearney

Lovin' It in Rural Kansas

Sheree Braddock
Sheree Braddock

Ten miles southwest of the rural community of Kendall sits Sheree Braddock's childhood home. Her grandparents moved to the area in the 1930s. For a dwelling, her dad dug a basement and moved two old school houses together. As the family grew, her father continued to add on rooms.

Pottawatomie

Toto Taco Owners
Craig and Colleen Lord (Photos by Tom Parker)

Not in California, er, Kansas Anymore, Toto

I confess to being something of a Mexican food aficionado. Or snob, if you prefer. My upbringing in New Mexico taught me the finer aspects of Mexican cuisine, and 26 years in Denver honed my instincts and sharpened my palate. Moving to Kansas improved my life in every way but one: quality Mexican fare was forever a thing of the past. Or so I thought.

Hamilton

Going From Non-Stop to One Stoplight

In my early twenties, life in the Big Apple in the city was fast, fun and exciting. I saw great bands play until early in the morning and hung out at the coolest bars. I had a union job with amazing benefits. I had a studio apartment for $1,300.00 a month. Something happening twenty-four hours a day. My life was fantastic.

Clay

Meg and family
Meg Perry and family (Photos by Tom Parker)

Where the earth breathes—Kansas by way of L.A.

When Meg Perry’s son, Bear Santos, first laid eyes on the dinky rural town where his mother had moved and was setting up shop, he looked around at the broad gravel streets, the vacant storefronts of what remained of the downtown area, the 20 or so homes and the green fields beyond, and said, “Now I truly know the meaning of ‘the middle of nowhere.’

Traveler's Tales

Blue Goose

The Blue Goose: A Rough Landing to Get Home

“I hope you can help me,” said the voice on the telephone. “I have searched the Internet, The K- State Collegian archives, the Wichita paper archives, and I can’t find a thing.”“What are you looking for?” I asked. “A pilot,” was the reply.

Pottawatomie

Tully's
Tully's Irish Pub and Dublin Grill (Photos by Tom Parker)

Taste of the Irish in St. Marys

When Joseph and Janice Trummer left the Lake Placid region of upstate New York almost 20 years ago, it was to follow their religious tenets, leaving their home and families a half-continent behind at Saranac Lake. They settled down in St. Marys, home to St. Mary’s Academy & College, a traditional Roman Catholic school operated by the Society of St. Pius X. It was a package deal, church services with Latin mass and an educational program focused on a conservative Roman Catholic lifestyle. That they now own and operate a pub may seem farfetched; they prefer to emphasize not the alcoholic beverages the pub serves, but what separate their business from others: ambiance and a killer menu.

 

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Last Updated October 16, 2008
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