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Looking into the Future’s Eyes

By Heather Poore

The Future: Addison Rose Poore
Addison Rose Poore

I have entered the most wonderful and scary club in the world. It is called motherhood. And while I am still adjusting (even after seven weeks) to sleepless nights and conversations that revolve around feeding and diapering this adorable bundle of joy, I am thankful that I am able to raise my daughter in rural Kansas.

The moment I heard the doctor say, “It’s a girl!” to the first cry, I knew I was lucky. Not only because my daughter was born healthy but because the entire community seemed thrilled for her arrival. It really hit me a couple days later when the Virginia Tech campus shooting happened. I started to think about all the things I want for my daughter: intelligence, values and a strong work ethic. I hope she can thrive in academics. I want her to try and experience a variety of clubs, sports and church groups. Above all I want her to have a strong sense of who she is and be proud of where she came from.

Some parents may worry about their children getting these experiences and how they will react to the outside world. I, however, do not. Where I live, we know our neighbors. And I know as my daughter grows, those neighbors will be reporting to me what she is doing—good or bad.

In the local school, she will have an opportunity to receive a great education because of the smaller class sizes. I know that if my daughter struggles in any subject, the teachers will not hesitate to call me and try to work with her to improve. She will be able to build her self-confidence by participating in all the clubs and athletics she wants, because the school district is small enough that there are no cuts for sports teams and no limit on the amount of activities.

I know without a doubt, my child will learn the value of hard work. Whether that be helping her Dad in the field or with one of the clubs that serves community dinners. She will get the unique opportunity to give back to her community at a young age and know that there is more to life than a paycheck.

Most of all, I believe, in my rural area, my daughter will learn who she is in a safe environment. I know that she can walk down the street by herself and not feel threatened. Just knowing that she can rely on not just me, but a host of other caring individuals if she ever needs anything. As it is right now, we cannot walk 10 steps without starting a conversation with someone about what she is up to and how she is growing.

My small community may not have a big box retail store or a shopping mall, but it has so much to offer my little girl. It is something that cannot be bought or sold. As I look into my future’s eyes, I feel a certain reassurance that this is where I belong, where my family belongs. And I would not have it any other way.

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Last Updated October 1, 2007
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